Home Heating using paraffin Inverter heaters

First of all, if you are considering buying a Paraffin Inverter Heater, but don’t want to spend the usual £250 – £300, then I have found a much better deal for you. Read on, and I’ll tell you where, at the end of this article!.

I know that when you read the title of this blog -   Home Heating using paraffin Inverter heaters, the word ‘paraffin’ alone, will conjure up those childhood memories of Grandad’s ancient paraffin heater running during long cold winters in his greenhouse and the lingering smell of paraffin which always used to follow, however before you hit the back button and leave, the paraffin inverter  heaters I will be referring to here, are top of the range, ultra modern safe paraffin heaters manufactured in Japan and of which are even more safe to use than portable gas heaters using calor gas bottles, and are so much better in other ways, such as producing  zero condensation compared to the portable gas heaters.

Many of those who are reading “Home Heating using paraffin Inverter heaters”, may be here out of pure morbid curiosity, but those open minded individuals who continue to read, will probably find that it actually saves them considerable amounts of money by switching over to paraffin heating for their domestic requirements, especially those trying to heat poorly insulated old buildings and those who are suffering from Storage Heater blues or indeed, are looking to substitute any form of expensive electric heating with something much more affordable.

For those readers with Gas central heating, lucky you!. This article is unlikely to be of any interest to you as you already have the cheapest form of heating known to man – Mains Gas. However even if you have central heating, you may need additional heating in an extension, conservatory, loft conversion or outbuilding where the cost of extending the gas central heating may not be economically viable, so stick around, as paraffin heating may still also be of interest to you, and will work out far cheaper than installing extra radiators or the huge expense of running an electric panel or fan heater.

Home Heating using paraffin Inverter heaters will be of the most interest to those in rural or remote locations who don’t have access to mains gas,  or households who currently use oil or lpg based heating systems, but the biggest savings by switching over to heating a home with a paraffin inverter heater will be to those using Economy 7 storage heating, Electric Central Heating or any form of electric heating appliances for their main heating, and this is where 30% – 70% savings can easily be made.

Home Heating using paraffin Inverter heaters

This is where my own experiences begin, I have a rural property which is outside of the mains gas area and doesn’t have any form of central heating, the property is insulated and has double glazing, however it suffers from one handicap, the fact that it has electric storage heaters. Those who have storage heaters will already know, that come mid-winter they are extremely inflexible, expensive to run and by around 5pm or 6pm they have exhausted all of their useful heat and once night falls, the room soon becomes cold. Electricity is supplied on Economy 7  or Economy 10 tariffs, and although these tariff’s give you seven to ten hours of cheap overnight electricity, the cost of the Electricity during the normal day (peak) periods is  significantly more expensive than on a standard non economy 7 tariff. Upto three or four times higher in fact!.

This means, that when the Economy 7 storage heaters inevitably run out of heat, by around late afternoon or early evening, some other form of ‘top up’ heating is required which  is often also electrically powered, such as a convector heater, panel heater, fan heater or oil filled radiator.

These types of heating appliance use extremely large amounts of Electricity and after several hours can soon work out to be prohibitively expensive, which then largely negates any savings made overnight during the E7 / E10 period in the first place.

Consuming electricity outside of the off peak period rapidly proves expensive. This is because E7 customers with storage heaters are openly penalised for their cheaper overnight rate and will pay double or even treble the cost for their daytime Electricity compared to non E7 electricity customers enjoying standard tariffs. The electricity companies know all about the limited effectiveness of storage heaters and because of these limitations know that there is a very real possibility that the majority of their E7 customers will require some form of top up heating at some point during the evening especially during the mid winter months, when the most expensive ‘peak rate’ periods will apply, and so are laughing all of the way to the bank.

In other words they give a discounted overnight during E7 / E10 off peak period which looks very generous on the surface, but they then quickly snatch most of that generosity back by charging very expensive daytime ‘peak’ rates at double or treble the unit cost compared to standard, non E7 customers. In addition, the discounted Off Peak rate of the Economy 7 period is also rapidly increasing, back in 2011 I was paying less than 5p per kw/h, in 2013 I am now paying 6.2p per kw/h (and some SSE customers are paying 8p per kw/h) – all far more expensive than mains Gas users who pay under 4p per kw/h all day long.

Electricity prices continue to rise, as do oil prices and LPG, minimum deliveries for both heating oil and LPG may also make fitting central heating boilers powered by those fuels unattractive. Fitting a wood burner is an ideal way of mitigating the ever increasing cost of Electricity, however this is not always suitable in some properties, and also for those living in flats, smoke free zones or who are renting their property from a landlord.

During winter 2010, I was paying almost £100 a month in Electricity costs to heat a 1 bedroom flat, based on running 3 large storage heaters, which was around double the cost of heating a Three Bedroom house with Gas Central Heating. When I arrived home from work I wasn’t feeling any real benefit from it either, and during the coldest winter months I still needed to plug in additional heating for several hours in the Evening just to be warm when watching the TV.

A quick calculation soon revealed the painful truth, in that for every hour I was running a 2.4 kw Convector Heater during the Afternoon / Evening, I was mitigating around 3 hours worth of Economy 7 cheap rate electricity!!, because my Electricity cost during the peak period was 3 times the cost of off peak, so it didn’t take long for the Electricity company to claw back, nearly all of saving I had made on the cheaper electricity which it had sold me overnight, whenever I needed to run the Convector Heater during the following Evening.

Additional energy price hikes had also been announced for the second time in a year, and I could see the day when paying £150 a month in Electricity would become a reality. I began looking for alternatives to Electric heating, and stumbled across a forum for Boat Owners and static caravan dwellers, who had seemed to have found a solution.

I was introduced to a modern day, Japanese manufactured indoor Paraffin heater. This was no ordinary basic old fashioned paraffin heater like the ones my grandparents had, but a sleek, safe and odourless fan assisted paraffin heater, with a kw heat output exceeding that of most standard convector heaters and being fan assisted it was also capable of heating a living area very quickly, and at a fraction of the cost of an Electric equivalent!.

I researched these paraffin inverter heaters further and traced their roots back to Japan, where central heating systems are rare, and where most Japanese families still heat their homes using these clever, safe and portable Corona Paraffin / Kerosene fueled modern space heaters. They are also used routinely in Southern France, where they are so popular that clean burn kero fuel is sold in most hypermarkets.

At first my prejudice about paraffin heaters and memories of the lingering small of paraffin came back to haunt me, but I decided that the Japanese were a clever race, and had developed many modern designs as far as Electronics goes and certainly wouldn’t be using Paraffin Heaters as their preferred, daily form of heating if it was dangerous, smelly or ineffective. Npower had also just written to me, announcing their latest price rises (for the fourth year running), I decided that anything to save me money over Npower’s E7 overpriced daytime rates was worth a go.

The manufacturer claimed that their paraffin heater was 99% efficient, which was actually much more efficient than even a Gas Powered ‘A’ rated central heating boiler, and almost the same 100% efficiency offered by direct Electric Heating. Unlike earlier paraffin heaters and Gas Calor heaters, this paraffin heater produced no room condensation and had many safety features which made it safe to use an everyday household form of heating, I was now convinced, so I ordered one.

The £200 that I paid for the Corona Inverter Paraffin Heater, seemed a lot to pay for a space heater, especially one powered by paraffin, but it turned out to be an astute decision which in turn, turned out to have paid for itself over one average winter, purely from the savings gained from top up heating using paraffin instead of the more expensive daytime Economy 7 rates.

The Paraffin Inverter Heater really gave me the best of both worlds, I could reduce my reliance (and use of) the expensive to run storage heaters which ran out of heat by 5pm, and then instead of using the Convector Heaters on an overly expensive peak rate electricity tariff when I got in from work, I simply fired up the Corona Inverter Heater to deliver heat whenever I was at home, at around a third of the cost of peak rate Electricity.

I read that Paraffin / Kerosene fuel burning at almost 100% efficiency will produce 10kw of heat from every litre of Paraffin / Kerosene it consumes. So lets do the maths, and let me actually prove the savings to you in my personal experiences.

I currently buy Electricity during the ‘peak’ periods from Npower, at around 21 pence per KW/H.

I originally bought Paraffin from a local allotment society for 70p a litre. I get 10kw worth of heat from each litre burned which brings down the price to 7p per KW/H. (I now pay 5.3p per KW for standard home heating oil kerosene @ 53p a litre but i’ll get to that later)

My Corona Paraffin Inverter heater produces 3200 watts of heat, or 3.2kw so on its full setting, for one hours worth of use it costs 3.2 x 0.07p to run = 22.4 pence per hour to give out 3.2kw worth of heat, enough to heat a fairly large living room or lounge-diner very quickly.

To run an Electric Convector Heater rated at 3000 watts  (3.0KW) it would consume 3 electricity units every hour, which would cost 3 x £0.21 units per hour to run – so £0.63 per hour to run a single 3kw heater when using peak rate electricity. By using the 3.2kw Corona Paraffin Inverter heater instead of a 3KW convector heater,  saves me £0.406 per hour in real terms, plus I get an extra 200 watt worth of heat from the Paraffin heater over the convector, which isn’t a lot, but does add up over a period of running during a typical evening.

So by using the Corona Paraffin Heater during the Evenings for an average of just six hours at a time, saves me £2.43 in heating costs per night, just by changing the way  that I heat the room and the fuel I use to do it, and trading Peak Rate Electricity back to good old fashioned Paraffin, in a state of the art heater.

Couple this with an average of 10 hours worth of use at the weekends, and that saving adds up to £4.06 per weekend day, so the potential saving by using paraffin adds upto £20.27 per week (£2.43 x 5 nights + 2x £4.06 per day at the weekends) – that’s an amazing £81.08 per MONTH in savings, just by turning the convector heater off and the paraffin heater on, and avoiding the use of expensive Electric heating.

The figures speak volumes, and in just three winter months of average use, i’ve effectively recouped the cost of purchasing the inverter heater and beyond that point, the savings are in my pocket for many winters to come!, and the money is far better in my pocket than those belonging to the shareholders of the expensive utility companies! (And so say all of us!.)

So there you go – what more can I say? other than that I paid off the outlay for my paraffin heater during the first half of its first winter, so the savings that I am getting at the moment – that £81.08 a MONTH is now mine to keep as the paraffin inverter heater is still going strong, and still saving me money, and i’m just as warm, I have made no other sacrifices to do it nor had to turn down any thermostats. As a result of switching to an Inverter Heater my £100+ monthly winter E7 Electricity bill is a nightmare from the past and has dropped to a more manageable £35 – £40 a month.

It is even possible to obtain paraffin far cheaper than the 70p / litre example I gave and so stretch those savings further, but i’ll move onto that shortly. Also bear in mind that the savings and comparisons I made are for one heater, if you have the requirement for more than one electric heater, and replace it with paraffin the total savings will increase even further by using a Paraffin Inverter Heater, in place of each Electric Heater, but the heaters are also portable and easily carried by one person, so it is possible to move it from room to room, living room to bedroom or even to the shed or caravan, and these heaters are also ideal for heating a conservatory.

Lets examine the features of the Corona Paraffin Inverter heater.

Safe and Reliable, being 99% efficient and having no external flue or chimney means more of the heat goes into the room, not out of the flue. Far more efficient than portable gas heaters, LPG fired central heating and virtually as efficient as more expensive electric heating, at 50% – 75% of the cost – FACT.

Portable – requires no installation or outside flue, just fill with paraffin / kerosene and plug it in

Has flame failure sensors, CO2 detection and switches off if it falls over or is knocked, making it far more safer to use in the house, shop or office than Gas Bottle heaters.

Produces no condensation, unlike earlier paraffin heaters and gas bottle calor heaters

Little servicing or annual maintenance, and no service contracts or repair bills – just an occasional fuel filter clean.

No wicks to replace or trim (Inverter model)

Is fan assisted for rapid warm up (Electric Fan requires 22 watts of Electricity, about the same as an energy saving bulb)

Digitally Thermostatically controlled, which switches to a paraffin saving eco mode (800w) when the room reaches the selected temperature. In Eco Mode the heater will run for an amazing 45 – 48 hours on one fill of fuel.

Has a digital timer, set it to come on after work or before you get up in the morning.

Virtually odourless in normal operation. Just a quick whiff when starting / stopping.

Available in various output sizes from 2,4kw to 4.5kw, the 4.5kw model will directly replace two convector heaters in larger  rooms, and the 3KW model I review here will be more than adequate for most average sized living rooms or an entire small flat.

Fan Assisted and Radiant Versions (which require no Electricity) available

The Corona Paraffin Inverter heater is ideal for use in Conservatories, Porches, Outbuildings, Garages, Shed’s or any location where extending central heating is too costly, its also a very viable and cheaper alternative to very expensive normal indoor Electric room heating in bedrooms, living rooms, kitchens, loft conversions etc and in these applications it does stand to save the average household anything upto 50% off the cost of standard tariff electricity and a massive 75% off daytime E7 peak rate electricity. In short if you are plugging in any form of Electric Heater on a semi-regular basis, then replacing it with one of these inverter heaters WILL save you money – between 30% and 70% depending on your current Electricity tariff.

Finally, lets see how the cost of running the Corona Paraffin Inverter heater compares with other fuels

Corona Paraffin Heater – 7p per KW (based on 70p / litre for C1 paraffin)

Corona Paraffin Heater – 5.3p per KW (based on 53p / litre for 28 second domestic home heating kerosene)

Economy 7 Daytime Rate (Npower) -  21p per KW

Economy 7 Off Peak Rate (Npower) – 6.2 p per KW

Standard Electricity Rate – 12p per KW

LPG Central Heating (tank)  – 9.5p per KW

LPG Central Heating / Gas Fire (bottle) – 15p per KW

Oil Fired Central Heating – 6p per KW

Mains Gas – 4.5p per KW

Wood Burner – 3p per KW

(example comparison rates as they stood at November 2013)

Also compare the £2500 – £6000 installation cost of installing Oil or LPG fired central heating with the £200 cost of the Paraffin inverter heater. Even if you bought four Paraffin Inverter heaters for use in a four bedroomed house, it would still cost less than £1000, that’s almost a sixth of the £6000 average cost of fitting a LPG based central heating system.

As you can see, the Corona Paraffin Heater is worth considering as a portable, money saving room heating alternative to either Economy 7 or Standard Electric Heating, as well as LPG heating. Its also ideal as temporary heating for outbuildings or for using on Boats and Static Caravans where LPG may prove very costly. It is also ideal for supplementary heating in short term rented accommodation as no flue or building modification is required and being portable you can take it with you when you move.

It is also possible to further reduce the cost of running the Corona Paraffin Heater from 7p KW to 5p – 6p KW by switching from C1 Paraffin to Kerosene (sold as domestic Heating Oil in the UK).

First, let me state the the Manufacturer advise using Class C1 Paraffin in this heater, however outside of the UK, Paraffin is also routinely known as Kerosene and the fuels are virtually identical. Thus it would seem to be acceptable to burn cheaper 28 second domestic heating oil Kerosene instead of Paraffin, and stretch the savings and make it easier to obtain (Heating oil is generally more readily available than C1 Paraffin).

In the UK, “Kerosene” is sold as 28 second heating oil, the same as home central heating oil fired boilers use. I have been buying and using  standard 28 second heating oil in my heater frequently for over 2 years (as of oct 2013), and with no adverse effects to either the heater or from excessive fumes / odours, however you do this in your own heater at your own risk.

By buying heating oil kerosene from a neighbour who has oil fired heating reduces my cost of the fuel from 70p per litre to 53p per litre, this means that the real cost of running my Inverter heater falls from 7p per KW to 5.3p per KW – making it almost as cheap as mains gas, and even less than the cost of Economy 7 overnight electricity which my (useless) storage heaters use.

However, once again I must stress that if you use domestic Kerosene in your own heater instead of paraffin you do so at your own risk!. If you wish to stick with the manufacturers recommendations on fuel, it is still possible to buy the recommended C1 paraffin at 70p per litre, try contacting your local allotment society, and looking in the yellow pages for local oil and fuel brokers, or if you are happy with Kerosene instead of paraffin, simply buy it in bulk from a heating oil supplier or from a friend / relative who uses heating oil fired central heating and most heating oil brokers have a self service pump available for small quantities.

If you do decide to use standard heating oil in your inverter heater, then I do strongly advise filtering the kerosene into the heater tank using a “Mr Funnel”. The Mr Funnel filter will ensure that any dirt and rust particles are removed from the fuel and that any trapped water caused by bulk tank storage is filtered out which ensures longer periods between cleaning of the heater filter and also prevents the heater from showing an “E4″ error warning (which indicates water contamination in the fuel). You can buy a Mr Funnel water and dirt filter from Here

Finally, let me tell you how you can save money on purchasing a paraffin inverter heater, brand new, and much cheaper than the usual UK sources. You can buy these direct from a European Source, far cheaper than the £200 – £300 from UK Retailers. Remember too, that there is no risk of import tax or additional duty on goods freely purchased online from European sources, and delivery only often takes 2 – 3 working days. At the time of posting this, you can buy a brand new, high specification 3000W Paraffin Inverter heater for under £180 including shipping to the UK, from Here

If you have any questions, comments or personal experiences in relation to using Paraffin for domestic home heating, then please use the comment form below.

25 Responses to Home Heating using paraffin Inverter heaters

  1. Margo Jackson says:

    Just found this site – thanks. I like the whole idea. But can’t find paraffin in Bath for less than £8 per 4-litres (local garden centre). Do you happen to know a cheaper source?

  2. admin says:

    Hi Margo,

    Paraffin, is certainly harder to source nowadays, compared to years ago, when many households routinely used it for heating and lighting, and there was a self service style pump on most local petrol station forecourts. The paraffin, now found in most DIY stores (and Garden Centres) is pre-packaged, and sold at a premium, hence the high price.

    Lately, i’ve been running my own inverter heater on oridinally household heating oil Kerosene, this is commonly sold as 28 second heating oil and used in domestic oil fired central heating, and whilst it is very diffcult to source heating oil from a local heating oil supplier in less than 500 litre quantities.

    Sometimes you really do have to be cheeky to get what you need, and I had great success with appealing through my local Freecycle website asking to buy small quantities of heating oil from people living in households fitted with oil fired central heating. Now I arrange to take my containers around to their address when they are expecting an oil delivery, and they arrange with their bulk heating oil supplier for an extra 50 litres to be dispensed into my (2x) 25 litre containers at the same time as they have their oil tank refilled.

    They also only charge me the actual cost of the oil, which works out at about 56p per litre or 5.6p kw/h in terms of the cost of running the heater on it. Of course they also get a bottle of wine and whisky from me at Christmas as a token of goodwill. So if you know anybody who uses oil fired central heating, then this may be one possible source.

    Alternatively, see if there are Allotment Societies close by who may buy bulk Paraffin for use in their members’ greenhouse heaters during the winter months.

    You can also buy premium paraffin online and have it delivered by courier. The price hovers around £20.50 for 16 litres, there is a delivery charge of £8.99 but this covers a delivery of upto 32 litres. You can buy it online from here:-

    http://www.chorleybottlegas.co.uk/products.cfm?pageurl=Premium%20Paraffin

    So the price for 32 litres including delivery would be £49.99, which equals £1.56 per litre. This is still very expensive compared to the other options, but compares favourably with your local quote of £8 per 4 litres, which would be £2.00 per litre

    You may also like to contact Caldo Oils on 01744 813 535 they are based in St Helens, however they also distribute bulk fuel all over the UK, and they may be able to put you in touch with a fuel broker in your location, who can supply you with either kerosene or C1 Paraffin.

  3. admin says:

    Margo,

    I have also found the following Allotment societies close to your location, who may be able to supply you with bulk purchased paraffin into Jerry Cans.

    http://www.banes-allotments.org.uk/
    http://www.allotmentssouthwest.org.uk/index.php?page=north-north-east-somerset
    http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/environmentandplanning/parksandopenspaces/Pages/Allotment%20Sites.aspx

    Don’t worry about the published waiting times given on the links, as you are not wanting to rent an allotment, just needing to purchase paraffin from their club. Allotment societies are often more than happy to sell to non members, as it raises a little bit of revenue for the society, although some may charge you a small membership fee to access their facilities, such as the on site store in order to make a purchase.

  4. tony says:

    This link might help people looking for Allotment Societies in London. I have no idea whether any of them sell paraffin. If anybody knows of any that do please let us know

    http://www.londonallotments.net/links.html

  5. brett chamberlain says:

    I have three of these inverter heaters and I use the caldo paraffin. I buy it in bulk in the summer usually and they deliver it for free when its convenient for them. http://www.caldo.co.uk/
    Two of my heaters have the E4 fault code problem. Anyone know how to fix this?
    Id be interested in trying out kerosene 28 in one of them. Are you sure there are no problems related to using it?

  6. admin says:

    Hi Brett

    E4 Faults are generally caused by contaminated fuel (usually a high water content) or poor combustion. Have you cleaned the plastic mesh fuel strainer filter located in the bottom of the heater where the tank nozzle slots into?. Its worth removing this and giving it a good scrub with old toothbrush or nail brush. Don’t forget to also clean the air intake filter located at the back of the unit also.

    If that doesn’t solve the problem then its probably Water contamination in fuel, which is a little harder to remove, but is common during the winter, especially if you have stored the fuel for any period of time in a cold area such as a garage or shed and happens when condensation forms inside the small airspace inside the container and drips into the fuel.

    The easiest way of removing it again, is to filter the fuel through a “Mr Funnel” type filter as you pour the fuel from the container into the heater fuel tank, this special filter removes all of the water which has found its way into the fuel, and in combination with a fuel filter and air filter clean, should remove your E4 error issue.

    In relation to running these heaters in Kerosene, I can only advise based on my own personal experience. I originally wrote the article above, nearly three Years ago, and since then I’ve continued to use nothing but 28 second Kerosene for fueling two inverter heaters, with no reported problems.

    I use my heaters in the Evenings when the E7 storage heaters run out of heat, and so they generally get around 5 or 6 hours hours of use every night in the winter months, so they are in regular use.

    There are also a couple of other Inverter heater users who also use Kerosene, who have commented on the C1 Paraffin Page http://electricheatingcosts.com/class-c1-paraffin/

  7. brett chamberlain says:

    Thanks for the reply. Ive just filled up my inverter paraffin heater with heating oil so will let you know if I discover any problems. If it works OK, and I dont get too many complaints about the smell, then I could be saving about a third on my paraffin costs. Might be more but I cant remember how much I paid last time. Thanks for the advice. Incidently, Ive bought spares from Dry it out for this heater and the man there was very helpful.

  8. brett chamberlain says:

    Heating oil works fine. Once I used up the paraffin I will use only heating oil. Thanks, great tip!

  9. Neil C says:

    Hi all! I borrowed a 3200 watt inverter to try out in my workshop. We used heating oil and it worked fine. I was amazed at how much heat was produced. I’m definitely going to buy one, but don’t know whether to spend extra and buy the same type from a UK supplier or go for the cheaper Italian supplied version. I can get the UK supplied one for £230.00 posted, but can’t help thinking that the extra £40.00 could be spent on fuel, if I buy the cheaper one. Is there any difference in quality between the two and do they use fuel at about the same rate? I don’t want to get the wrong one for the sake of £40.00.

    Thanks in advance.

    Neil.

    PS. A mate of mine is thinking of one for his log cabin.

  10. admin says:

    Hi Neil,

    Thanks for your comment. Yes, these little inverter heaters really are amazing, and do save loads of money, especially when compared to Electric Heaters of the same wattage. I’ve used domestic heating oil instead of the expensive Premium paraffin in both of my inverter heaters now for a couple of years, and suffered no ill effects whatsoever. However you may want to invest in one of the “Mr Funnel” type filters if, like me, you intend to use the heater on heating oil on a permanent basis.

    In respect of your question regarding which heater to buy, well I have both a “branded” (Corona) inverter heater and also one of the OEM copies, which are often re-badged and sold as Ruby or Kero and these versions seem very popular heaters in Europe. The one I have is a Kero SRE series which I bought through Brico Bravo, all of the heaters are imported through exactly the same main European importer and distributor and so they all have to conform to very stringent EU safety regulations, so on the issue of safety there should be no comparison between the Corona heaters and the cheaper Italian model. I also find it to be just as well built – at least nothing has broken, fallen apart or started leaking, and both heaters get used on a daily basis during the winter months.

    The Italian heater seems to have a slightly smaller fuel tank capacity, and I would estimate it to hold around 4 – 4.5 litres as opposed to the 5 litres which I can squeeze into the Corona fuel tank.

    Fuel consumption seems to be roughly the same, they are both rated at 3200 watts output, and use roughly the same amount of fuel on a litre by litre basis. The Italian heater has slightly better temperature controls than my Corona 3016, and as well as having the usual digital temperature settings, the Italian heater also has ‘Min’ and ‘Save’ functions where you can manually switch the heater to its lowest (800w) setting or into fuel saving mode, whilst in comparison the Corona will switch between its Low and High settings automatically based on the digital temperature settings, there is no manual override.

    So, I find the Italian heater is much more flexible for background heating, such as warming a bedroom an hour or so before it becomes occupied, I just leave the heater on its minimum setting, regardless of the setting on the digital thermostat.

    I’m sure that your friend will find these ideal for heating a log cabin especially if the only alternatives are Electricity or LPG, which is where the biggest savings with these heaters can be made. I use mine as a main source of heat in a flat-annexe attached to a farmhouse, in a rural area with no mains gas. Using the fitted storage heaters was both expensive and inefficient and since using the Inverter heaters I have transformed the previously cold, drafty flat into a warm comfortable living space and at the same time, also taken the sting out of the winter energy bills.

    This is now the middle of the third winter where I have relied on them, and they have both more than paid for themselves in the savings.

  11. Neil C says:

    Being able to set it on the lowest setting would be excellent and ideal for what I want to use one for. This is the one I’m looking at buying….

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Indoor-Multifuel-Stove-Electronic-Inverter-Heater-3000W-SRE300-Paraffin-Kerosene-/131012925917?pt=UK_Home_Garden_Hearing_Cooling_Air&hash=item1e80fa99dd

    It differs only slightly from the one in your link, smaller tank and and 800 to 3000 watts, opposed to a 1000 watts minimum. My mate uses Mr Funnels, so that won’t be a problem. :-)

    Glad I found this site, as I’ve found it very useful and I’ve sent links to some other friends, one of which hates modern light bulbs and only has electric.

  12. Matt says:

    There is a health hazard to use this device as the main source of heating

  13. admin says:

    @ Matt do you actually have anything to back up your claims that these heaters are a health hazard? or are you just a troll spouting random, ill-informed scaremongering information?. On your next post here, please provide us with valid sources for your claim, ideally a fact based lab report from a reputable / medical source, and of which mention these heaters by name.

    I find it difficult to believe that these heaters would be allowed to be freely imported and sold in the UK (and indeed in the more stringent, safety & environmentally aware EU) if there was any threat to health whatsoever and in the UK we pretty much quickly ban anything and everything if there is even a tiny risk that it will maim or kill.

    Yes, there is a very small risk of CO2 poisoning if the heater is used in a very confined space, however this risk applies to ANY open flame combustion based heater, including the popular mobile gas heater or even a badly maintained log burner or a gas fire with a blocked chimney. In other words, don’t fire one of these up in order to heat a wardrobe or a tent, and make sure you buy the correct heater for the room size and that there is some natural room ventilation. However, all of these inverter heaters carry built in CO2 monitoring with cut outs, which will extinguish the heater should you choose to fire it up in something small like a wendy house and CO2 levels rise above normal safe levels!, (The many built-in safety features actually make an inverter heater safer to use than the other heating appliances which I mentioned). There are also some common sense safety rules when filling these heaters with fuel, but i’m sure that I don’t need to point out obvious things like that.

    On a more personal note, I use two of these heaters (living area and bedroom) on a regular basis, and as my main source of heating in a small flat, and this is now well into my third winter of doing so. During this time, I have never had any medical complaints, nor suffered from any breathing related ailments, runny eyes, headaches, flu-like symptoms etc, nor have I spontaneously combusted. I also have a carbon monoxide detector and a standard smoke detector, and the Inverter Heater has, so far, triggered neither of these.

    So, if there was any health hazard attached to using these heaters, after three years of regular use, I would be a prime candidate for the earliest of symptoms by now.

    I will also point out, that these heaters are very popular in households all over the world, in fact they are still the MAIN source of heating in millions of Japanese households, and have been for many years (over 700,000 portable inverter heaters were sold in Japan in the winter of 2011 alone), in fact kerosene fueled portable Inverter heaters are far more popular and common in Japan than Gas Central Heating systems.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerosene_heater
    http://archive.is/ZEuin

    In addition to Japan, they are also a popular source of heating in France, Spain, Cyprus etc and are very popular with UK Ex-Pats living out there, to the point where their usage has grown so much, that Kero is now sold in bulk containers at most Hypermarkets.

    http://www.expatica.com/es/essentials_moving_to/essentials/Heating-up-your-Spanish-house-in-winter_13362.html

    http://www.expatforum.com/expats/cyprus-expat-forum-expats-living-cyprus/287377-kerosene-heaters.html

    http://santiagotimes.cl/kerosene-heater-sales-rise-50-percent-as-chiles-weather-cools/

    I would also be happy to provide more links Matt, all of which will further negate your scaremongering, however, since I have already taken the time to link to several sources, all of which back up my own points, would you now also have the courtesy to share your sources Matt?.

  14. admin says:

    @ Neil C – Yes that heater looks very familiar, I think it is from the same family as my SRE model came from, although mine is a slightly older model, but it was also from the same vendor – Brico Bravo.

    It is a shame that Brico, seem to be constantly hiking their prices at the moment. I paid around £149 inc delivery for my SRE heater from them just a few winters ago, and their price also seems to have gone up by yet another £10 since last month!. I would perhaps suggest buying one soon, or there won’t be much saving to be made over buying a Corona from a UK source. I know a few people who already have chosen to buy a “Branded” Corona heater for the extra £30 – £40 rather than the Cheaper Brico version, even though, personally, I rate them equally.

    I may remove the Brico link page as its not so much of a deal anymore, but if anybody knows a cheaper alternative for these heaters then please comment the link below and I will promote it.

  15. Matt says:

    thank you for your advice.am living in 3 rooms cotage house and i want use this heather like main source because central oil heathing in mi house is expensive for one person.It uses only two rooms in the evening since the whole day of work and home is only 15 degrees when they return to work.

  16. Neil C says:

    Ordered the heater a few days ago and I decided to get the small Mr Funnel from the eBay link. Funnel arrived today, just need the heater now. :-)

  17. Neil C says:

    Heater arrived today and at first I was a little disappointed as the first thing I saw was ‘Made in China’ on the box. I then thought that nearly everything you buy these days is made there so decided I shouldn’t worry about it. The build quality is actually very good.

    I chose to try it out with paraffin, just in case it was faulty, so the fuel couldn’t be used as an excuse not to repair/replace it under guarantee.

    Anyway, I needn’t have worried as it fired up lovely and gave out loads of heat, even running at only 800 watts.

    One extra bonus is that on eBay it’s listed as £189.99, but the receipt reads €189.99, so hopefully it’s cost me under £160.00. I’ll post again when the bill comes in.

  18. George B. says:

    Hello Admin,
    Thank you so much for taking the trouble to research and offer all of this advice. I have been a fan of Paraffin heating for years, no doubt because my mother used it to keep us toasty warm throughout my childhood through the fifties and sixties and I am still here!. In those days, other than an open fire or electric there was little more choice to be had. I still use an Aladdin blue flame and also have a KSP Ruby which warms the whole downstairs rooms and even up stairs as we are open plan. It is a wonderful heater. I have ordered an Inverter heater and it seems to be the same model that you have talked about. We intend to replace the gas and electric as our main heating and cut it down to a minimum, maybe only for hot water due to the rip-off costs. We love it and are certainly warm and cosy. Keep up with your excellent work and thank you once again.

  19. admin says:

    Hi George,

    Thank you for your kind words. This blog is pretty much a “work in progress”, which will be constantly updated as the technology evolves, and more and more users of these heaters contribute their own experiences and advice. Right now it serves to give advice to those who feel trapped by the constant rising of energy prices, and that it is possible to save some money without having to make the sacrifice of being freezing cold and uncomfortable in the process.

    I’m a child of the 70′s, an era when Storage heaters and Gas Central heating was gaining ground and becoming the heating of choice in modern new build houses. However I fondly remember walking to school, past the local garage, complete with its self service paraffin pump on the forecourt, in fact I believe that even then paraffin was widely available from virtually every petrol station and hardware shop, and it cost very little, at least in real terms compared to the inflated prices of the pre-packaged stuff today.

    Hopefully, the growth of heaters such as these will trigger a return to seeing paraffin and kerosene being easier to obtain and more widely available as I know that many visitors to this website are having difficulty sourcing a supply of fuel locally, especially those in larger cities, who are often restricted to the small 4 and 5 litre containers sold in DIY Stores, which often equates to a cost over £2 a litre. A price which is quite ridiculous, considering its a duty rebated heating fuel, and far easier and cheaper to refine in bulk than petrol.

    Its quite ironic, that energy prices have now rocketed to the point where many consumers are actively returning to the traditional fuels which were popular many decades ago, such as paraffin heaters, open fires and wood burners and I can see this trend continuing as the energy companies try to squeeze more and more people towards fuel poverty. Hopefully, heaters such as these, will at least allow us to even the balance a little.

  20. George B. says:

    Hi admin, Thank you for your reply and what you have said is very true. Over the years, it seems to have been engineered, what with the clean air act coming into effect back in the sixties, which had to happen with all the London smog’s that I can remember very well. In return, most new built houses since then have been designed without chimneys and therefore steering everyone towards cleaner gas central heating. It was a god send to those of us that had never known such luxury, but it has got to the stage where they have us by the short and whats names!. I have now received my new Inverter heater and I am as warm as toast right now, what a great investment. All I worry about now is that the powers that be, do not start pricing us out of Paraffin as people start to revert back to our good old favorite and very reliable form of heating, we can but keep our fingers crossed. Thank you for your time and my best regards. George.

  21. Yvonne says:

    Hi, can anyone help and work out how much it would cost to have one of these heaters on 24/7 in cold weather. I lost my home and have come to live with a relative with all of my many cats. The cats are housed outside in a summerhouse and a garage with duvets and sofas etc, but as they are elderly they must be kept warm. My calor gas heating bill from late last August to the last bottle I purchased in early June amount to over £3000! I cannot repeat the same this winter as I simply cannot afford it. So please, can anybody work out for me how much it would cost having one of these heaters on 24/7. Both the summerhouse and the garage cat studio have plenty of ventilation. Thank you somebody. xxxxx

  22. admin says:

    Hi Yvonne,

    There are a lot of variables in working out how much it is going to cost to heat any room, aspects such as the physical size of the room, the desired temperature, the level of insulation in the fabric of the building and of course the outside temperature at any given time. So for example it is going to cost many times as much to heat a 20ft x 15ft room with poor insulation, than it would to heat a 10ft x 10ft room with a large amount of modern wall and ceiling insulation.

    The same variables apply to the outside temperature also, for example you are going to need more energy / fuel to heat a room to 18c when its -10c outside than you would to heat it to the same 18c when its 7c outside, so as you can see its not just a case of saying it will cost a fixed £5 per day, everyday throughout winter, as the demands on the heater and how much fuel it consumes are going to change on a daily basis depending on how cold it is that day, and how high the room temperature is set on the heater.

    One of the best ways of saving money on heating, any heating is to better insulate the room, this may be as simple as carpeting the inside walls (if it is an outbuilding) to add a cheap, simple layer of insulation to better insulating the doors with draught excluder. Ideally you need to choose the building which has the best level of insulation to house your cats as this of course will be the cheapest to heat.

    On its lowest setting a Paraffin Inverter heater will run for around 56 hours on 4 litres of Paraffin / heating oil, which equates to around 14 hours use per 1 litre of fuel. On the surface this sounds very attractive and cheap, however you will need to decide whether the lowest setting of the heater will be enough to keep the room heated 24/7, or whether the heater will be switching to its higher setting(s), which wil of course consume much more paraffin.

    At the other end of the Scale, the heater will consume 1 litre of paraffin / heating oil for every 3.3 hours of use, which is on its most highest setting. From experience, your usage will probably fall somewhere between the two points, again depending on how cold it is outside and how well the room holds the heat, hence it is extremely difficult to pin down an exact running cost.

    I use two of these heaters for heating an entire flat, and in the coldest winter months, I use around £40 – £45 worth of heating oil every month, based on Evening and Weekend domestic use at a 21c room temperature setting, so compared to a £3000 Calor bill then I suspect that there is some scope for you to save money by switching over to an Inverter Heater, however do make sure that you are able to easily obtain heating oil (cheaper than paraffin) locally, I pay around 65p per litre, and its an idea to stockpile several containers worth over the summer (when heating oil is cheaper), as the price tends to escalate suddenly as Autumn approaches and demand increases!.

    Finally, I suspect that you could also save money simply by using a cheap 1kw heater in the room for your cats, I have worked out that a 1kw heater running continuously for 24 hours a day would only cost £86 per month or £860 for the same 10 months where you have paid £3000 for Calor, so my advice is that MOST alternative forms of heating would seem to work out cheaper than using Calor in this application.

  23. Rita Lloyd says:

    I am contemplating buying 2 of these heaters. I have found your blog so encouraging. Just a few questions
    1) Am I correct in saying using heating oil may effect the warranty ??
    2) I would try and keep the warranty or some sort of emergency cover on it, I am guessing that it would only be covered if I use the oil the manufacturer recommend ?
    3) Am I correct in understanding you said it saves about 1/3 on the cost of fuel by using heating oil? I am trying to way up the difference between using the cheaper option and jeopardising the warranty against the possible cost of repairs.
    4) What is the safest way of storing the fuel,it will be outside.
    5) If I chose to, would I be able to buy 500 litres and store it in a regular Oil Tank? Could I get one fitted, raised up with a tap do you think?

    Thank you again Mr Admin for all your help and advice in advance
    Rita Lloyd

  24. Rita Lloyd says:

    Sorry forgot these questions

    1) What is the biggest quantity one can get the recommended Paraffin in?

    2) Where would I get and what sort of tank would I need to store that in?

    3) If they stop working for any reason and it was out of warranty, who would one turn to to get it repaired

    4) Is it possible and do they need servicing annually??

    Think that is it !!!!!! Many thanks

  25. admin says:

    Hi Rita,

    Whether using domestic heating oil in these heaters will void the warranty, is largely down to the wording in the warranty section of the user manual, as it does vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. For example, the manual for a Corona Heater states that the user should only use premium fuel in their Inverter Heaters, which if the warranty is to be preserved, effectively means using only the recommended £1.40+ litre premium pre-packed fuel from the heater dealers and larger DIY chains. Unfortunately this negates any real savings in using these heaters to replace Electric Heaters or Storage Heaters, especially when the one off purchase cost of the actual heater(s) is also added into the equation.

    However some of the Chinese Heaters are a little more flexible in relation to the fuel, and my cheap imported ‘Kero’ heater states in the user manual that Kerosene Fuel should be used, and since 28 second heating oil sold in the UK is essentially Kerosene, then there should be no problem with the warranty.

    It all comes down to how much you value your warranty, over the potential to save money over your future energy bills. I took a little bit of a gamble and I have been lucky in that both of my heaters are still going strong well outside of their warranty period. If this Winter they stopped working, the money I have already saved over Electricity, would replace them both and at the same time, still offer a saving over what I would be paying to Npower or Eon.

    The void between Kerosene (Heating Oil) and Premium Paraffin is huge at the moment, around 70p – £1.00 a litre cheaper for heating oil compared to pre-packaged premium paraffin, depending on what the premium products are sold for locally, so it doesn’t take long to get back the cost of the heater, *IF* it should fail in the warranty period.

    Unfotunately, you can only buy the Premium Paraffin products in 4 litre containers in the UK usually from Hardware stores and DIY Chains, which works out very expensive. You can sometimes find 20 or 25 litre drums online, however since the Royal Mail stopped carrying hazardous fluids in 2012, its extremely expensive to buy these products by mail, as the special carriage charges are often three times the cost of the actual purchase. This is another reason to find, buy and transport your own fuel from a local broker.

    You also have to take into account, that in Japan (Where these heaters are routinely used in place of central heating) they largely only have Kerosene available locally, “Premium” products are largely unknown in places like Japan and the U.S. Perhaps its a European thing. So if you did get unlucky and the heater fail under warranty, I suspect that it would be nothing to do with the fuel, considering their popularity in non premium product places, like Japan.

    I would, however, recommend using one of the “Mr Funnel” type filters to filter the fuel as it goes into the heater tank, as we do see some small amounts of water, dirt and rust particles in fuel which has been bulk stored in underground tanks, at some point in its distribution.

    In respect of storing the fuel, I use basic plastic 25 litre “Jerry Cans”, and visit my local fuel broker about once a month (in mid winter) to fill 4 containers (100 litres) this can easily (and legally) be carried in a domestic car / small van. I then keep these in the Garden Shed (alternatively they could be kept in one of those lockable plastic Garden chests, which are designed to hold gardening tools). These 25 litre containers often carry fruit juice for the licensed trade and various other trade fluids. If you have one of the commercial car washing businesses locally (e.g IMO), they are also used to carry detergent, and often these businesses are happy to give them away as they usually have to pay for them to be disposed of. Ebay is also another option.

    In fact Ebay has many weird and wonderful containers for sale, ranging from 30 / 60 litre screw top barrels, to 120 litre ‘rain butt’ type containers. Provided the top is removal and air tight (with the top in place) then anything can be used. Most house insurance policies allow you to keep upto 100 or so litres of fuel at the address provided its outside of the house in a shed or other outbuilding. Anything above 100 litres then you would need a proper ‘bunded’ fuel container, which are often used for domestic heating oil boilers and store 500+ litres.

    There is nothing stopping you from obtaining your own small bunded heating oil tank of 500 litres, however you would have to buy this outright as the fuel brokers will only subsidise them as part of an oil fired boiler heating installation contract, and they can be as much as several hundred pounds although they do appear on Ebay as second hand. If you did choose for a bunded heating oil tank, you could site it in the garden and have a fuel delivery broker of your choice to come and fill it from a tanker. Provided its an approved tank and you meet the minimum delivery quantities, I suspect that they won’t know (or care) whether its feeding a boiler or your inverter heater.

    Other alternatives, are IBC’s of 600 and 1000 litres (Google or Ebay them), however if you are intending to have a local broker deliver to you from a road tanker, you would need to check first that your local broker is happy to fill IBC’s from their tanker though, as often they will only fill approved bunded tanks – although I suspect most won’t care as long as its located in the Garden away from the house, in good condition with no leaks and they can reach it with their hose.

    If you do choose a smaller container / drum (25 – 100 litres) try and fill the container as far to the top as you can to minimise air gaps and screw on the air tight lid / cap as tight as possible.

    I have only serviced my heaters once in about 4 years, and I did this myself (I have put a guide and a “how to” on this website) which can probably be carried out by anybody with a reasonable level of DIY Skill. If you prefer not to do or try this yourself then I would suspect that most plumbers or heating engineers would be more than happy to service it, or alternatively there was a place in Preston who advertise their services over the Winter months and offer mail order servicing of Inverter Heaters for around £45 per heater, the contact name for the person dealing with this was Alex and the number given was 07988774336 – however I have never personally used this company.

    Most problems can be avoided by keeping the fuel stored in air tight containers, away from sunlight, and filtering it as it goes into the heater tank, as well as basic routine monthly maintenance such as cleaning the fuel filter and air filter. Using the correct start up / switch off routine as described in the manual also prevents the heater jets becoming clogged with carbon.

    Finally, given your questions, I would perhaps advise that you start out with just one heater first, and at the same time establish a local supply of fuel. Once your confidence in using these heaters grows, you can then add another heater at a later date. This was what I did, and so far, four years on, I have no regrets, just the saving of around £40 – £50 a month in my monthly Electricity bills during the colder months.

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